Headlines > News > Equinox: Analemma over the Callanish Stones

Equinox: Analemma over the Callanish Stones

Published by Klaus Schmidt on Sun Sep 23, 2018 10:48 am via: NASA
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Does the Sun return to the same spot on the sky every day at the same time? No. A more visual answer to that question is an analemma, a composite image taken from the same spot at the same time over the course of a year. The featured analemma was composed from images taken every few days at 4 pm near the village of Callanish in the Outer Hebrides in Scotland, UK. In the foreground are the Callanish Stones, a stone circle built around 2700 BC during humanity’s Bronze Age. It is not known if the placement of the Callanish Stones has or had astronomical significance.

The ultimate causes for the figure-8 shape of this an all analemmas are the tilt of the Earth axis and the ellipticity of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. At the solstices, the Sun will appear at the top or bottom of an analemma. Equinoxes, however, correspond to analemma middle points — not the intersection point. Today at 1:54 am (UT) is the equinox (”equal night”), when day and night are equal over all of planet Earth. Many cultures celebrate a change of season at an equinox.

Image Credit & Copyright: Giuseppe Petricca

Image Credit & Copyright: Giuseppe Petricca

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