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Commercialization of N-Prize Technology

Posted by: USJay - Wed Jul 10, 2013 1:58 pm
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Commercialization of N-Prize Technology 
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Post Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Wed Jul 10, 2013 1:58 pm
The N-Prize effectively identifies the lower limit of spaceflight -- orbital and suborbital nanosatellites carried aloft by nanolaunchers. These ought to be recognized as “N-Class” or “N-Type” aerospace technology to commemorate the contribution of the N-Prize to the field.

The ultimate goal of the Orteig Prize, the Ansari X Prize and other such competitions has always been to spur commercialization of the technology. Charles Lindbergh’s flight in 1927 demonstrated that airplane design had improved to the point that serious contemplation of regular long distance airplane service as a commercial enterprise could begin.

Success in the N-Prize competition (“...and there was much rejoicing!”) will likewise raise interest in the possibility that regular low-cost N-Type aerospace transportation is not only technically feasible, but also commercially viable. Investors will step forward, experimentation will give way to standardization, markets will be identified and commercial operators will rise or fall on their business acumen as much as on their technical skill.

This raises many questions. Of immediate concern to competitors is premature disclosure of intellectual property. The N-Prize requires fundamental innovation, meaning patentable inventions. Patent rights themselves were invented to be powerful drivers of technological innovation. Without patent protection, innovators in this or any other field would have no motivation to pursue commercial success, because bigger businesses with deeper pockets would always be able to outmaneuver them with ease. Intellectual property rights are immensely valuable.

In the United States, the recent passage of the “America Invents Act” (AIA) has dramatically redefined the obligations of innovators, in my opinion, to the detriment of independent inventors. Before the AIA, inventors in the U.S. were free to discuss new ideas openly, within reason, so long as they carefully documented the progress of their experiments. Now, under the new rules of the AIA, any publication of any details can cause the irrevocable loss of all patent rights to a new invention. The AIA effectively suppresses the open exchange of ideas that might develop into commercial products or processes. Unfortunately, absolute secrecy has become the standard.

For N-Prize contenders looking beyond the competition to commercial development of N-Type aerospace technology, this means discussing progress is simply impossible. Not good for the forum, but good for business.


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Wed Jul 10, 2013 11:14 pm
Does "discussing progress" mean keeping secret whether a team is still in the running?

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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:26 am
No. UpStart is still in the running.


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Thu Jul 11, 2013 12:28 am
Anyone else?

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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Thu Jul 11, 2013 1:12 pm
Walking rather than running as things have fallen thru several times over the years after optimistic announcements but the Potent Voyager core team has recently been in talks with a patent lawyer and needs to expand upon a lot of paperwork. We are more a tortoises cousin than a hare in the race but if things go well the Turtle might move giving us a free launch :wink: :twisted: sometime in an indeterminate future.

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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Thu Jul 11, 2013 2:27 pm
Remember, in Aesop's fable the tortoise won the race!


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:17 am
If you want to win the N-Prize I do suggest it would be wiser to develop an new technology. As I believe our team has run this to the end of the current tech.
What you really need to win is a completely new approach! My suggestion to new teams would be to study the most recent data from Cern and follow new developments in particle physics, magnetics and gravity.

Chemical rockets really are not what you want trust me.

If you don't have money your REALLY going to have to THINK! Ponder and postulate. On the order of the Manhattan Project level in this day and time. Go another route!

That would really make the N-Prize worth while.

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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Fri Jul 12, 2013 7:38 am
Molesats is in the running.
Lunch to space next year.


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Fri Jul 12, 2013 12:13 pm
There is no need to invent entirely new means of propulsion. Chemical rockets will do just fine. The motto of William Bushnell Stout, an aircraft designer (among other things) during the first half of the twentieth century, was “Simplicate and add lightness.” Many variations of this maxim have made the rounds. Stout kept his motto posted on his office wall as a constant reminder of the compromises that are necessary in aircraft (and aerospacecraft) design. Sometimes to simplify this component we must complicate that one, or to reduce weight here we must add weight there.

The motto of the N-Prize ought to be “Small and Cheap” (nothing personal, Paul). The challenge is primarily financial. The inventiveness that is necessary is not just to miniaturize existing technology, but to find ways to reduce conventional spaceflight to its simplest form and therefore lowest cost. Maximize efficiency, minimize weight, simplify construction, find low-cost alternatives to conventional materials and components and so on. Every aspect of the challenge is about reinventing conventional chemical rockets to be smaller and cheaper. There is plenty of room for improvement.


Last edited by USJay on Tue Jul 16, 2013 6:14 am, edited 1 time in total.



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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Fri Jul 12, 2013 5:08 pm
Oh well perhaps it can be done with a chemical rocket- perhaps. But how cool would it be to do it with ease rather than struggle. I imagine a device that perhaps cost $1000 USD that can wiz away into space.
Some smart young man will do it one day.

Monroe

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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Fri Jul 12, 2013 6:08 pm
It seems like for the near future the best approach is to develop a small liquid fuel engine that can be used for the lower stages, and possibly a solid fuel motor for the final orbital-insertion stage. Using this in combination with a balloon would seem to be the cheapest way to go.

I would imagine that a reliable and inexpensive liquid fuel engine would be something that could be commercialized.


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Sat Jul 13, 2013 8:48 am
USJay wrote:
There is no need to invent entirely new means of propulsion. Chemical rockets will do just fine.

There is no other viable option to orbit an object around the earth...other than fantasy. The trick is to improve how you do it (with chemical rockets).

USJay wrote:
The challenge is primarily financial...
Every aspect of the challenge is about reinventing conventional chemical rockets to be smaller and cheaper. There is plenty of room for improvement.

I agree fully though launching any rocket into orbit for amateurs is no easy undertaking. The very things that are needed to make things smaller, lighter, cheaper, etc are the things that make it harder to do but in doing so successfully, the rewards will be great. I see industry making rockets bigger with more lift capacity for payloads that do more things (and make more money in the process) just as automobiles have gotten larger and more expensive. The little guy can make things light in weight and less expensive just as an automobile can be made with bicycle wheels, a small motor, be inexpensive and get great mileage but who would want one?

As for the challenge of going into space, in Sugar Shot, making sugar motor rockets is easy, making them lighter and increasing the performance is not; the same is true of APCP, hybrids, and liquid fueled rockets. Anyone who disagrees should try it.


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:03 pm
Paul, I just revisited your website and realized I have been accidentally misidentifying your work in molecular biology. Corrections have been made. Just out of curiosity, what sort of experiments (in small words, please) would you like to loft into orbit? You must have something in mind, based on your past experience as a present expert in the future field of extraterrestrial biology! Teams of very inventive people are working to create the new business of low-cost commercial spaceflight so they can charge you for the service. All major credit cards accepted.


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Thu Jul 25, 2013 8:39 pm
Ah yeah!
Let's keep working. Believe me all of our efforts in the N-Prize have a reward. New technology is been developed by us.

Best,
Joshua


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Post Re: Commercialization of N-Prize Technology   Posted on: Fri Jul 26, 2013 10:46 am
Go! Joshua Go!

Monroe

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