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Prototype of a self-repairing vehicle-hull

Posted by: Ekkehard Augustin - Fri Sep 09, 2005 10:14 am
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Prototype of a self-repairing vehicle-hull 
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Post    Posted on: Thu Aug 21, 2008 4:20 pm
The article "New Thin Skin to Protect Tiny Spacecraft" ( www.space.com/businesstechnology/080819 ... craft.html ) says about about newly found materials that can protect small vehicles.

It would be interesting to know if they are that protective for manned vehicles as well. If yes they might assist self-repairing hulls as an outer layer it seems to me.

The article says that
Quote:
scientists have now invented a razor-thin skin that can protect craft against the extreme heat and intense cold found in outer space and withstand micrometeoroids hurtling at thousands of miles per hour.
.

So the selfrepairing skin might be damaged a bit less than without that other skin perhaps. The capability to repair itself would be required only if something hits at a velocity higher than those ones the outer layer can withstand.



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Post    Posted on: Wed Sep 03, 2008 2:43 pm
On 11th of August this year there was a longer article about glues or pastes.

It is reporting that even bridges at present are pasted together without no screws or nails. Even airplanes are reported to be pasted instead of welded.

But there are more interesting news about that - Sciebtists at the Fraunhofer-Institut für Fertigungstechnik und Materialforschung in Bremen and the german company Sustech are developing glues or pastes that can be commanded to activate or disactivate their capability to hold something together. The advantage is that repairs are simplified that require the removal of pasted parts.

The key are microscopic particles with magnetic properties that react to microwaves. So the warmth that some pastes/glues need can be generated precisely that moment that no access to something behind the thing to be fixed is required no more.

The nano-pastes/glues have receiver-particles that are nanoantennas. Those are doted Ferrits, diameter around 10 nanometers. Oliver Nedors, responsible for such technologies at Sustech is quoted to have said, that the method is matured for the market.

The Head of the Institut für Klebtechnik ("Methods of Pasting"), Helmut Schäfer is squoted to have said, that crash-surviving pastes/glues have been developed for the car-industry in the near past and that this was a major breakthrough.

So what about using such pastes/glues for self-repairing hulls? No Epoxy would be needed - there might be a command which either could be given by an impact or by something or someone else. May be that a command by a human is required if the damage is located where the damage isn't that much of a problem or where prior to the repair something else must be repaired at the same location.

The posibility to disactivate the paste may be of interest if the paste is provisirorical only until a real repair is possible. Then the paste might be reused if the damage is repeated. In so far reliability may be increased.

The crash-surviving paste may be a good prevention of damages.

What about it?



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Post    Posted on: Wed Oct 22, 2008 6:58 pm
These technologies are also useful when attempting to repel boarders!

It is not practical to launch SpaceCraft with metre thick steel hulls.

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Post    Posted on: Wed Feb 18, 2009 11:08 am
An article under www.wissenschaft.de is reporting about material. found to be significantly harder than diamonds. These materials might be applied as layers for space vehicles according to the article.

They really have been found in 2005 already but until recently it was unknown by how much they are harder than diamond in fact. The material called "Wurtzit-Bornitrid" in German - I do not know the english name since there is no article at Wikipedia about it - is by 18% harder than diamond, Lonsdaleite is by 58% harder than diamond.

These are the resukts of simulations.

"Wurtzit-Bornitrid" has the advantage of being resistable to higher temperatures than Lonsdaleite if exposed to the air - which seems to be not that crucial in space to me and I would nonetheless prefer to keep reusable vehicles for deep space missions or lnar trips in space.

Both materials are very rare which is the reason why their hardness was unknown. Because of this it would now be interesting to find methodes to create them artificially.

The article refers to www.newscientist.com/article/dn16610-di ... erial.html .

Applying these materials would mean that self-repairing vehicle hulls might be applied earlier since this property doesn't need to be improved or extended that quickly.

What about it?



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